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Same-Day Emergency Visits

Emergencies happen all the time and can be quite frightening when it happens in and around the eye. Common eye emergencies include foreign bodies in the eye, chemical injuries, corneal scratches, corneal erosions, orbital fractures, eyelid infections, styes.
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Foreign Bodies​

On the busy streets of New York, particles can get into your eye at any given moment. It is recommended to always use protective lenses when woodworking, or working with iron, or metal. Dr. Rapoport can check for any foreign bodies in every part of the eye and using special instruments remove and metal, iron, or other foreign bodies embedded in the eye.

Chemical Injuries

Chemical injuries include getting any type of acidic or basic element in your eye- such as hair dye, nail polish remover, superglue, regular glue, or solvent/ cleaner in the eye. It is crucial to get to an ophthalmologist as soon as possible if any of these happens as the sooner treatment is initiated, the less damage there will be. Dr. Rapoport irrigates the chemical out of the eye, and starts a combination of antibiotic, steroid, high dose Vitamin C, and an oral antibiotic. If the top layer (the epithelium) does not heal, then Dr. Rapoport sometimes places an amniotic membrane.

Corneal Scratches

Any foreign body or irritant or eyelash can cause a corneal scratch. The cornea has more nerve endings than anywhere in the body (this is a good thing from an evolutionary point of view!) and so the smallest scratch can be incredibly painful- this is a normal reaction. Dr. Rapoport uses a combination of drops, ointments, bandage lenses and special healing membranes to help the scratch heal.

Orbital Fractures

If your eyeball is short and you are farsighted (your prescription begins with “+” then you may be at risk for acute angle closure. This happens then the pupil enlarges and the iris bunches up into the angle where the aqueous usually drains. This leads to the fluid in the front of the eye not having a place to drain, and your intraocular pressure becoming very high. This can result in pain in around your eye, nausea, vomiting, redness, light sensitivity, a red eye, and decreased vision. Dr. Rapoport treats this by lowering the pressure using a combination of drops and oral medications, and occasionally a laser to relieve the pressure. If a laser is not done in the immediate setting, then it should be done later on to create a “safety valve” and to prevent an acute angle closure attack from happening again in the future.
For minor injuries such as a black eye, applying cold compresses to the affected area can help bring down swelling and allow the injury to heal faster
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Acute Angle Closure Glaucoma

If your eyeball is short and you are farsighted (your prescription begins with “+” then you may be at risk for acute angle closure. This happens then the pupil enlarges and the iris bunches up into the angle where the aqueous usually drains. This leads to the fluid in the front of the eye not having a place to drain, and your intraocular pressure becoming very high. This can result in pain in around your eye, nausea, vomiting, redness, light sensitivity, a red eye, and decreased vision. Dr. Rapoport treats this by lowering the pressure using a combination of drops and oral medications, and occasionally a laser to relieve the pressure. If a laser is not done in the immediate setting, then it should be done later on to create a “safety valve” and to prevent an acute angle closure attack from happening again in the future.